Empowering, rewarding: 5 reasons why becoming a sabbatical officer is the perfect graduate position

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Knowing what you want to do after university is a tricky prospect. Job-hunting is daunting and the pressures of cementing your dream job can at times feel overwhelming. However, if you want a meaningful graduate experience, your ideal job could be within the very walls of your university.

 

1. It’s rewarding

Typical sabbatical posts involve being an Education Officer, Welfare and Equality officer or even the role of President within your university. All of which have immense value and reap a wealth of rewards.

The Guardian reported that ‘[t]he most valuable thing Dan Norman walked out of university with was not a certificate with his degree on it, but the year he spent from 1996 to 1997 as a full-time student union sabbatical officer.’ Considering what being a sabbatical officer brings to the table, it’s easy to see why.

 

2. It enhances you career prospects

 

While helping others and growing confidence, you’ll be enhancing your career prospects during your year as a sabbatical officer. Being a sabbatical officer teaches you transferable skills while enhancing your current skillset, which looks great on your CV and can be applied to a range of jobs in the future.

Adam Kitcher, who worked as University Treasurer at the University of Hull last year, says: ‘I can honestly say I've loved every minute of the job. It was fantastic getting involved with students and making a difference. When I first started I was very unclear about what I wanted to do, but now I have a better idea of the kind of work I want to go into.’

And this opinion isn’t uncommon. Emma Henry, Communications and Campaigns officer says: ‘You learn such a wealth of skills…I think I've learned more in the past three months than in the whole three years of my degree.’

 

3. You’ll be helping students

 

It’s clear that becoming a sabbatical officer helps you to acquire a diverse range of skills that develops you as a graduate and creates a great talking point at interviews, but what else does it offer? A sabbatical post helps you make a real difference to students within your university. During the post, you have the opportunity to represent a body of thousands, vouching for their needs and providing a network of support, which means that your role would directly benefit students.

 

 

4. You’ll learn new skills

With a political, administrative and social side, a role as a sabbatical officer creates networking opportunities, teaches you communication and negotiation skills, and improves your time management and multitasking ability. To say the least, a sabbatical position is pretty varied.  

 

5. You get the university experience for one more year

The position also gives you the chance to be immersed in the student experience for one more year, which brings a host of advantages. Many graduates feel more comfortable remaining in their university location which is often home to their friends, and with the added benefit of a year’s pay, the lifestyle can be fantastic.

Becoming a sabbatical officer provides an experience you can learn from and get genuine satisfaction in doing it. On top of wide-ranging benefits, you’ll build confidence and feel more equipped for the world of work beyond your year as a sabbatical officer.

 

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